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UI in the News

July, 2002

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HENDRIX TURNED DOWN CEO POST (Detroit Free Press, July 31)
The Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute in July named Dr. John Ruckdeschel, a Tampa cancer administrator, as chief executive officer. The institute initially asked MARY HENDRIX, Ph.D., a research scientist and deputy director of the Holden Comprehensive Center at the University of Iowa, to take the CEO job. Hendrix said while she "really wanted the job," she turned it down because it would have meant breaking up a large research team at Iowa.

UI PART OF TUITION HIKE TREND (Los Angeles Times, July 31)
A second bad year for the economy is driving up tuition and fees on many public four-year campuses as state revenues decline while costs keep escalating. "Last year, overall, wasn't pretty. This year is worse," said Travis Reindl, director of state policy analysis at the American Association of State Colleges and Universities. "The situation's pretty much caught up with everybody. The effects of the economic slowdown are being fully felt." The National Association of State Universities and Land-Grant Colleges, which represents the larger public institutions, posts a running tuition survey of its members on its Web site. Using the Web survey as a guide, The Associated Press asked college officials around the country about in-state tuition and fees this fall. The University of Colorado at Boulder is typical of public schools: it is raising tuition and fees 6 percent for in-state undergraduates, to $3,566 from last year's $3,357. Other cases are more dramatic: Texas A&M University tuition and fees will soar nearly 28 percent for incoming freshman and transfer students; University of Kansas tuition is up nearly 21 percent; and UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, saw a 19 percent rise.
http://www.latimes.com/search/lat_all.jsp?Query=%22university+of+Iowa%22

UI PART OF TUITION HIKE TREND (New York Times.com, July 31)
A second bad year for the economy is driving up tuition and fees on many public four-year campuses as state revenues decline while costs keep escalating. “Last year, overall, wasn't pretty. This year is worse,” said Travis Reindl, director of state policy analysis at the American Association of State Colleges and Universities. “The situation's pretty much caught up with everybody. The effects of the economic slowdown are being fully felt.” The National Association of State Universities and Land-Grant Colleges, which represents the larger public institutions, posts a running tuition survey of its members on its Web site. Using the Web survey as a guide, The Associated Press asked college officials around the country about in-state tuition and fees this fall. The University of Colorado at Boulder is typical of public schools: it is raising tuition and fees 6 percent for in-state undergraduates, to $3,566 from last year's $3,357. Other cases are more dramatic: Texas A&M University tuition and fees will soar nearly 28 percent for incoming freshman and transfer students; University of Kansas tuition is up nearly 21 percent; and UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, saw a 19 percent rise.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/national/AP-Tuition-Hikes.html
A version of this Associated Press article appeared July 31 on the online NANDO TIMES:
http://www.nandotimes.com/business/story/484463p-3868162c.html
A version of this Associated Press article appeared July 31 on the Web site of the BALTIMORE SUN:
http://www.sunspot.net/news/nationworld/nation/wire/sns-ap-tuition-hikes0801jul31.story
A version of this Associated Press article appeared July 31 on the Web site of the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE:
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2002/07/31/national1525EDT0739.DTL
A version of this Associated Press article appeared July 31 on YAHOO NEWS: http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/ap/20020801/ap_on_re_us/tuition_hikes_2
A version of this Associated Press article appeared July 31 on the Web site of the BAKERSFIELD CALIFORNIAN: http://www.bakersfield.com/24hour/business/story/484463p-3868162c.html

REPORT: TENURED FACULTY TEACHING LESS (Omaha World-Herald, July 31)
Tenured faculty have been teaching fewer and fewer classes over the last four years at Iowa's public universities, according to a report from the Board of Regents, State of Iowa. At Iowa State, tenure-taught credit hours fell from 64 percent to 58 percent from 1997 to 2001. At the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, those hours fell from 56.3 percent to 55 percent. While the hours taught by such faculty or tenured staff is on the decline, the number of student credit hours taught has jumped from 800,201 in the fall of 1996 to 839,276 in the fall of 2001. State funding to the universities is declining. The Legislature has trimmed $56 million from the University of Iowa, $50 million from Iowa State and $16.5 million from Northern Iowa in the last two years.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=461992

HICHWA COMMENTS ON PET SCANNING (BusinessWeek, July 30)
The magazine profiles Michael E. Phelps, who in 1974 along with postdoctoral student Ed Hoffman invented the first positron emission tomography (PET) scanner. Unlike X-rays, which display only the body's structure, PET reveals chemical and biological processes within the body. It illustrates, for example, how the brain remembers and thinks, how the heart beats, and how the pancreas synthesizes insulin. PET imaging could eventually become a tool used in yearly physicals, thus helping doctors detect -- and treat -- diseases at their inception, says RICHARD HICHWA, director of the PET Imaging Center at the University of Iowa Hospitals & Clinics. In a PET scan, a patient is injected with a tiny amount of radioactive glucose, then wheeled through the doughnut-shaped PET camera. As the glucose spreads through the patient's veins, heart, and tissue, the camera takes pictures. Because cancer cells gobble up sugar, an image showing a spot of glucose absorption could indicate a malignant tumor.
http://www.businessweek.com/technology/content/jul2002/tc20020730_9488.htm

PERSONALITY AND HEALTH LINKED (Seattle Times, July 30)
New data suggest that certain personality types, not just clinical conditions such as depression, can affect a person's health. Researchers from the University of Iowa recently interviewed 174 patients early in the course of kidney disease, and then followed the patients' progress. The researchers found that patients who ranked high on a scale called "neuroticism" had a 37.5 percent higher mortality rate than the rest of the group. People who scored low on a test of "conscientiousness" had a 36.5 percent higher mortality rate. Those who scored high on the neuroticism test tended to feel chronically anxious or agitated and usually expect the worst. High scorers on the conscientiousness test tended to see themselves as planners and "think every day about what needs to be done," says researcher ALAN CHRISTENSEN. A patient's personality may one day be incorporated into the whole medical assessment, he hopes, although he acknowledges psychologists have often had a difficult time convincing their medical brethren. Medical students usually aren't coached in counseling, he says, because they have more important things to learn. When people go into an emergency room with a bleeding artery, they don't want doctors to ask them about feelings. "You want them to stop the bleeding and suture the artery," he says. "There's a reason they're trained to think that way."
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/nationworld/134503036_mindbody30.html

DAMASIO DISCUSSES NEUROSCIENCE ETHICS (Seattle Times, July 30)
As the revolution in brain research rolls on faster than anyone anticipated, it is opening the door to mind-bending possibilities. Many of them seem scary even to the scientists themselves. That's why a group of prominent neuroscientists, philosophers, psychiatrists, ethicists and others met recently at the historic Presidio in San Francisco overlooking the Golden Gate Bridge. Their mission was to find a way to alert the world to the coming promises and dangers arising out of science's growing power to understand and manipulate the brain. "How can we with neuroscience help in understanding ethics? How is it that biology produces what we call social behavior and ethical rules?" asked Dr. ANTONIO DAMASIO, head of neurology at the University of Iowa College of Medicine. Damasio is conducting pioneering brain imaging studies showing that damage to a certain part of the brain from a stroke or injury can cause a person to do the wrong thing, even though he knows the difference between right and wrong.
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/healthscience/134503029_neuro30.html

DAMASIO DISCUSSES NEUROSCIENCE ETHICS (Macon Telegraph, July 29)
As the revolution in brain research rolls on faster than anyone anticipated, it is opening the door to mind-bending possibilities. Many of them seem scary even to the scientists themselves. That's why a group of prominent neuroscientists, philosophers, psychiatrists, ethicists and others met recently at the historic Presidio in San Francisco overlooking the Golden Gate Bridge. Their mission was to find a way to alert the world to the coming promises and dangers arising out of science's growing power to understand and manipulate the brain. "How can we with neuroscience help in understanding ethics? How is it that biology produces what we call social behavior and ethical rules?" asked Dr.ANTONIO DAMASIO, head of neurology at the University of Iowa College of Medicine. Damasio is conducting pioneering brain imaging studies showing that damage to a certain part of the brain from a stroke or injury can cause a person to do the wrong thing, even though he knows the difference between right and wrong. (The Macon Telegraph is a daily newspaper in Georgia. This article originally appeared July 21 in the CHICAGO TRIBUNE.)
http://www.macon.com/mld/macon/news/nation/3757097.htm

JOHNSON: U.S. DRUG MARKET NOT WORKING (Omaha World Herald, July 29)
This opinion piece was written by NICHOLAS JOHNSON, former co-director of the University of Iowa Institute for Health, Behavior and Environmental Policy. He teaches at the University of Iowa College of Law. "Looks like we'll have to nationalize pharmaceutical research, abandon patents and put drugs in the public domain -- at affordable prices. Those words do not spring naturally from my keyboard. Market competition can be the consumer's best friend. It's my first choice. But our drug market isn't working. Like most Americans, I prefer pragmatism to ideology. Are our Interstate highways, national parks, military and public libraries 'socialist'? Who cares? They work. We combine public and private enterprise. A public school uses private lawn maintenance. A privately owned building has government inspectors examining the safety of elevators or the cleanliness of restaurants. We do what works."
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=609&u_sid=459470

IOWA BEGINS CONSTRUCTION OF NEW LABS (Omaha World Herald, July 29)
State officials broke ground Monday on a new $51.8 million laboratory campus to house the state's crime lab, the medical examiner's lab, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HYGIENIC LAB and the Department of Agriculture laboratory. The labs will be in separate buildings on the grounds at Des Moines Area Community College, but officials said having them in such close proximity will foster communication. Gov. Tom Vilsack noted the labs are being built with money from a special fund for construction and repairs, not money from the cash-strapped general state budget. "It's not competing for scarce state dollars with education, health care and human services," Vilsack said.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=461004

SIGNING TAUGHT AS FOREIGN LANGUAGE (Baltimore Sun, July 28)
While many schools are offering American Sign Language as a foreign language, the idea is not universally accepted. At issue for educators and lawmakers is whether ASL has the components of a bona fide language -- a set of unique linguistic components, a culture, a body of literature, all components of other languages. "I think one of the reasons that people will be skeptical is because they're so used to thinking of languages as being spoken," said DOUGLAS BAYNTON, an ASL professor at University of Iowa. "The idea that you can have a language on your hands is just very foreign."
http://www.sunspot.net/news/local/midatlantic/bal-ca.sign00jul28.story

GURNETT’S SPACE SOUNDS SET TO MUSIC (Omaha World-Herald, July 28)
For nearly four decades, University of Iowa astrophysicist DONALD GURNETT has analyzed and interpreted the solar system's chirps, whistles and grunts, all captured during dozens of unmanned space flights by sophisticated radio receivers he invented in the early 1960s. Besides the occasional request from broadcast journalists, Gurnett rarely thought his recordings could have relevance beyond the world of astrophysics, let alone serve as the melodic and rhythmic accompaniment to an inventive twist in contemporary chamber music. Gurnett said: "I'm not a musician but I've spent my life studying the sounds and phenomenon of sound waves, so in a way we kind of speak the same language. I really didn't have a clue how or why you would set this stuff to music." Minimalist composer Terry Riley is putting the "stuff" to music, and the result is an 85-minute multimedia piece called "Sun Rings." The Kronos Quartet will perform it in concert halls in America and Europe this fall, including its Oct. 26 premiere in Iowa City.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=526&u_sid=457667

MOONEY COMMENTS ON HOME NAMING (Chicago Tribune, July 27)
Do you plan to name your new home? If so, you'll partake in a tradition that dates back to ancient Rome, at least. House-naming is more common in rural areas than in the city, notes BARBARA MOONEY, a University of Iowa assistant professor. "And, people more often name houses that stay in the family," she says. Historically, most house names glorify a local event or an aspect of the home or landscape, she says. "You don't find them named for swamps," she says. Many early American homes reflect their owners' European roots.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/classified/realestate/newhomes/chi-0207270168jul27.story

COLEMAN: OPENNESS WILL AFFECT SEARCH (Omaha World-Herald, July 27)
The outgoing president of the University of Iowa says it will be hard for the school to hire someone who's already a school president because of the state's open-search requirement. The search was triggered by MARY SUE COLEMAN's announcement in May that she's leaving Aug. 1 after nearly seven years at Iowa to become the president of the University of Michigan. Coleman's resignation came as a surprise to the Iowa Board of Regents. The presidential search process in Michigan is exempt from that state's open-meetings law. In Iowa, interviews with candidates can be held behind closed doors until finalists are selected. At that point, the names of finalists are made public. "I don't think the regents can go for a sitting president with an open search," she said. "Iowa has taken a different approach. When I was hired, rather than going after a sitting president, they went after people who had promise and who were largely provosts and others who had not been a sitting president yet."
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=459075

UI STUDENT JAILED FOR OVERDUE BOOKS (Omaha World-Herald, July 27)
A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA graduate student spent the night in a county jail cell because he forgot to return 20 items to the Iowa City Public Library. Marco Maisto, a poetry student in the Writers’ Workshop, was charged July 1 with fourth-degree theft. Library officials said overdue charges and fines total $447. The 23-year-old student had checked out six compact discs, four cassette tapes, and 10 books, police reports said. Armed officers arrested Maisto, a bartender at an Iowa City tavern, on July 1 at the end of his late-night shift. He spent the night in jail on $2,000 bail. Maisto said he will contest the charges in court before returning the items, which are now more than three months overdue.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=458929

NUMBER OF FEMALE PRESIDENTS RISES (The Plain Dealer, July 26)
Karen Holbrook, named yesterday as the first female president of Ohio State University, joins the ranks of women who head high-profile universities. Nationwide, about 22 percent of college and university presidents are women, according to the American Council on Education. They include MARY SUE COLEMAN, who was chosen in May to become president of the University of Michigan. The former president of the University of Iowa will be the first woman to lead Michigan. (The Plain Dealer is in Cleveland, Ohio.)
http://proxy.lib.uiowa.edu/login?url=http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=e1d78cfdc6df8fe7b107255d2314879e&_docnum=4&wchp=dGLbVzb-lSlAl&_md5=39825e170f00b7e48929323c8b181928

UI, OTHERS USING EX-PRESIDENTS (Chronicle of Higher Education, July 26)
Several recent resignations have forced at least three universities to bring former presidents back for repeat performances. They have decades of experience, they kept the trustees happy the last time around, and they're old hands at the issues facing universities today. One such former president is WILLARD (SANDY) BOYD, University of Iowa. First term, 1969-81; appointed interim president this summer after MARY SUE COLEMAN accepted the presidency of the University of Michigan. Age when first named president: 42. Now: 75. Annual tuition then: $620, in-state. Now: $3,692. Major issues then: Money and diversity. In 1969, with civil-rights issues and the antiwar movement stirring up campuses nationwide, the university also faced budget gaps and rapid growth. But the biggest priority of his first term was to open up the university to a more-diverse student body. Major issues now: Money and diversity. Budgetary concerns continue to plague the university, Mr. Boyd says, so current priorities are fairly simple, among them holding down class sizes and retaining faculty members. Diversity continues to be a top priority. His take on his return: "I'm basically the same person, only older -- a lot older."
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v48/i46/46a00801.htm

COLEMAN PART OF PRESIDENTIAL TREND (Chicago Tribune, July 26)
Ohio State University trustees voted unanimously Thursday to hire the school's first female president, the latest in a string of appointments of women to college presidencies across the country. The trustees appointed Karen Holbrook, senior vice president for academic affairs and provost at the University of Georgia, to run the nation's second-largest campus. At least 20 other women have been selected since January to head American community colleges, four-year schools and universities. Among them is MARY SUE COLEMAN, who left the University of Iowa to become the first female president at the University of Michigan. Women have steadily, if slowly, moved into academic management over the last 25 years, said Claire Van Ummersen, vice president of the Office of Women in Higher Education at the American Council on Education.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/chi-0207260329jul26.story
This Associated Press article also appeared July 25 on the Web site of the LOS ANGELES TIMES:
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/wire/sns-ap-ohio-state-president0725jul25.story
This Associated Press article also appeared July 25 on the Web site of THE GUARDIAN (U.K.):
http://www.guardian.co.uk/uslatest/story/0,1282,-1904966,00.html
This Associated Press article also appeared July 25 on the Web site of the BALTIMORE SUN:
http://www.sunspot.net/news/nationworld/nation/wire/sns-ap-ohio-state-president0725jul25.story
This Associated Press article also appeared July 25 on the Web site of the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE:
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2002/07/25/national1433EDT0705.DTL
This Associated Press article also appeared July 25 on YAHOO NEWS:
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/ap/20020725/ap_on_re_us/ohio_state_president_1
This Associated Press article also appeared July 25 on the Web site of USA TODAY:
http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2002-07-25-osu-president_x.htm

GILCHRIST COMMENTS ON FARM RULES (Omaha World-Herald, July 26)
Political lines still divide the committee setting standards for a new state law that regulates factory livestock farms. The council of 12 researchers, environmentalists and farm group representatives is establishing a grading system that would give points to farmers who take precautions to prevent runoff and ease neighbors' concerns when building large farms. Committee members have had a variety of concerns in developing the criteria, and they sometimes have disagreed with each other about the standards they should encourage farmers to meet. Representatives of the University of Iowa and the Iowa Environmental Council said Thursday that they want farmers to be given points for proposing to build smaller farms, saying manure leaks and spills are less likely to occur on them than on megafarms. "You are supposed to consider environmental and community impacts," said MARY GILCHRIST, director of the University of Iowa Hygienic Lab.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=458150

UI LAB AGAIN IDENTIFIES WEST NILE VIRUS (Omaha World-Herald, July 26)
Two new reports of West Nile virus were reported to Iowa health officials Thursday. The positive results on a dead blue jay that was found in Jones County came back Wednesday night from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HYGIENIC LAB, said Kevin Teale of the Iowa Public Health Department. Six birds in five counties have tested positive for the virus since last September.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=457850

UI ALUMNA BUCKS PUBLISHING TREND IN TAIWAN (The Star, July 26)
Many of Taiwan's major newspapers and magazines are cutting pages and laying off staff as the island tries to limp out of its first recession in decades. Diane Ying is doing the opposite. The publisher and editor-in-chief of Common Wealth is expanding the business magazine, one of Taiwan's most influential periodicals. This month, Ying abandoned the Chinese-language publication's monthly format and became a biweekly. Ying has a master's degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and has reported for the Philadelphia Inquirer, the Asian Wall Street Journal and The New York Times, among other publications. (The Star is an English-language daily newspaper in Malaysia.)
http://thestar.com.my/news/story.asp?file=/2002/7/26/latest/6364Taiwanpub&sec=latest

CAMPBELL REPORTS MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY CAUSE (Science Daily, July 25)
Subtle defects in the processing of a single protein that provides structural integrity to muscle cells can lead to several devastating forms of muscular dystrophy, according to studies by Howard Hughes Medical Institute researchers and their colleagues at the University of Iowa. The scientists reported in two papers published in the July 25, 2002, issue of the journal Nature that defects in enzymes responsible for the processing of the structural protein dystroglycan are the underlying cause of several rare forms of muscular dystrophy that affect muscles and cause additional developmental brain abnormalities including mental retardation. The new findings will immediately help doctors in providing accurate diagnosis and appropriate genetic counseling to patients and their families. In the longer term, knowing the underlying cause of the muscular dystrophies will help researchers tailor their interventions, according to Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator KEVIN CAMPBELL, UI Foundation Distinguished Professor of Physiology and Biophysics.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/07/020725080828.htm
This news was also reported July 25 on Yahoo News:
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/hsn/20020725/hl_hsn/molecular_mechanism_may_hold_clue_to_md_brain_defects

MUSICIAN IS UI ALUMNA (San Francisco Chronicle, July 25)
A profile of local musician Jill Olson notes that the Ottumwa native got her start in music after attending the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/gate/archive/2002/07/25/jolson.DTL

FERENTZ, BOWLSBY CONTRACTS EXTENDED (CNNSI.com, July 25)
The University of Iowa football coach and athletic director have each received raises and long-term contract extensions, deals that rank them among the best paid in the Big Ten, university officials said. Football coach KIRK FERENTZ signed a five-year contract extension that increases his annual base salary from $310,000 to $510,000, making him the highest paid university employee. By comparison, interim President WILLARD "SANDY" BOYD will be paid $281,875. Along with the base salary, Ferentz can earn at least $910,000 after factoring in outside income from camps, endorsements, apparel sales and television and radio programs, according to terms of the deal released Wednesday. "Kirk has done a tremendous job for our university," said Athletic Director BOB BOWLSBY. "The progress we've made competitively over the last three years has been substantial. The work done developmentally with the program has been nothing short of outstanding." Bowlsby’s contract calls for an annual base salary of $345,000, up from $332,908 last year. The deal also includes performance and longevity bonuses and expires in 2008. His current contract was to expire at the end of the month. "I wasn't planning on going anywhere, but my current contract was getting ready to run out," Bowlsby said. "I really feel like our best years are ahead of us. There are a lot of reasons to be excited about what's going on here."
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/football/college/news/2002/07/24/iowa_ferentz_ap/
This news was also reported July 25 on the Web site of the MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE:
http://www.startribune.com/stories/503/3114310.html
This news was also reported July 25 on the website of the OMAHA WORLD-HERALD:
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=38&u_sid=456474

SMOTHERS: STAIRCASE IS SOUND (Omaha World Herald, July 25)
The signature spiral staircase at the Old Capitol has survived a rigorous weight test to prove that it is structurally sound, University of Iowa officials said. The rare reverse spiral staircase withstood 9,000 pounds of sandbags during a July 10 inspection. It was the first load test performed on the staircase since a Nov. 20 fire destroyed the Old Capitol's historic dome and caused extensive interior water damage. "The load test is vital to see if there was any structural damage due to it being so wet," said ANN SMOTHERS, director of the Old Capitol Museum. "It performed just beautifully."
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=456987

GROUPS URGE CHANGE IN BEACH POLICY (Omaha World Herald, July 25)
Environmentalists are urging the state and federal governments to toughen beach-closing policies after a national group reported that beaches nationwide continue to have problems with bacteria. Activists with the Iowa Public Interest Research Group and the Iowa Environmental Council said Wednesday that state and federal regulators are putting swimmers and beachgoers at risk of getting sick because they are inconsistent when closing beaches and posting warnings. Iowa is one of only 14 states that regularly monitor most or all of their beaches. With the support of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HYGIENIC LAB and State Department of Public Health, the Department of Natural Resources announced in March that officials wouldn't close beaches this year.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=457013

WEST NILE VIRUS DETECTED (Lincoln Journal-Star, July 24)
Another dead crow infected with West Nile virus has been found in Iowa, this time in Linn County. A dead crow found over the weekend in the county was infected with the virus, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HYGIENIC LAB reported Tuesday afternoon. Testing at the state lab found the virus in a dead crow in Iowa City last week and in dead crows earlier this year and last year in Scott County. One dead bird in a county is sufficient to prove that the virus is present, Tom Hart, Linn County Public Health supervisor, said Tuesday. The Journal-Star is published in Lincoln, Neb.
http://www.journalstar.com/latest_reg.php?story_id=12982

DEPRESSION NOTED AMONG BRAIN INJURED (St. Petersburg Times, July 23)
A finding by Dr. ROBERT G. ROBINSON, chief of psychiatry at the University of Iowa College of Medicine, could help explain the millions of diagnoses of depression in people who have suffered brain injury from strokes or other causes. Robinson found that the left frontal cortex, which puts a positive emotional spin on experiences that make us feel good, is particularly vulnerable to damage. When that feel-good feeling is erased, Robinson said, depression fills the void.

COLEMAN COMMENTS ON NEW JOB (Christian Science Monitor, July 23)
It's been a swift climb through the academic ranks to the pinnacle of higher education for MARY SUE COLEMAN, the new president of the University of Michigan. Coleman is moving to Ann Arbor from the top spot at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, where she has been president since 1995. She is the first woman to hold the prestigious post at the school, one of the nation's top public research institutions. But her gender is not something she dwells on. As she crisply points out, "Being president of a university is a hard job, equally tough for men and women. The pressures are no different." Yet as Dr. Coleman and others acknowledge, it's becoming far less unusual for a woman to occupy the top jobs in higher education. About 22 percent of college presidents are women, the American Council on Education reported recently. That compares with just under 10 percent in 1986 and half that level a decade earlier.
http://www.csmonitor.com/2002/0723/p16s01-lehl.html

CITIZENS GROUP FIGHTS FOR AIR QUALITY (New York Times, July 23)
An Iowa citizens group fighting for cleaner air said proposed air-quality standards don't go far enough to protect the health of Iowans. The Environmental Protection Commission is considering new air-quality standards as part of a new law to toughen environmental rules governing factory livestock farms. Last summer, Gov. Tom Vilsack asked researchers at Iowa State University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to study air quality in Iowa and make recommendations to the Department of Natural Resources. Bob Uetz, chairman of Iowa Citizens for Community Improvement, told the commission that it would be remiss if it only included standards for hydrogen sulfide and ammonia and not odor, as was called for in the researchers' report. He said the state shouldn't wait until December 2004, as outlined in the new livestock bill, to enforce the standards. "This is a public health issue and we are suffering now," he said.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/business/AP-Farm-Scene.html
The Associated Press article also appeared July 23 on DOW JONES NEWSWIRES:
http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,BT_CO_20020723_001922-search,00.html?collection=autowire/30day&vql-string=%28%22University+of+Iowa%22%29%3Cin%3E%28article%2Dbody%29

This Associated Press article also appeared July 23 on the Web site of the BOSTON GLOBE: http://www.boston.com/dailynews/204/economy/FARM_SCENE_Iowa_citizens_group:.shtml
This Associated Press article also appeared July 23 on the Web site ofthe OMAHA WORLD HERALD: http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=454896
This Associated Press article also appeared July 23 on YAHOO NEWS: http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/ap/20020723/ap_on_bi_ge/farm_scene_1
This Associated Press article also appeared July 23 on the Web site ofthe SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE:
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2002/07/23/financial0506EDT0021.DTL
This Associated Press article also appeared July 23 on the Web site of the BALTIMORE SUN:
http://www.sunspot.net/business/nationworld/wire/sns-ap-farm-scene0723jul22.story

SOUNDS OF SPACE PUT TO MUSIC (Independent Online, July 23)
For nearly four decades, University of Iowa astrophysicist DONALD GURNETT has analyzed and interpreted the solar system's chirps, whistles and grunts, all captured during dozens of unmanned space flights by sophisticated radio receivers he invented in the early 1960s. Besides the occasional request from broadcast journalists, Gurnett rarely thought his recordings could have a relevance beyond the world of astrophysics, let alone serve as the melodic and rhythmic accompaniment to an inventive twist in contemporary chamber music. Gurnett said: "I'm not a musician but I've spent my life studying the sounds and phenomenon of sound waves, so in a way we kind of speak the same language. I really didn't have a clue how or why you would set this stuff to music." Minimalist composer Terry Riley is putting the "stuff" to music, and the result is an 85-minute multimedia piece called "Sun Rings" which will be performed in concert halls in America and Europe. The Independent Online is part of a South African newspaper group. http://www.itechnology.co.za/index.php?click_id=5&art_id=qw1027407062595C432&set_id=9

BLANCK COMMENTS ON ADA (U.S. Newswire, July 22)
Twelve years after the signing of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) in 1990, the mood in the disability community is somber as it approaches the ADA's anniversary on Friday, July 26, according to this article. The three Supreme Court rulings narrowing the parameters of the ADA this term have brought to a head a trend many believe are impeding efforts to create a more accessible society. "We are at a high-water mark of the Supreme Court's articulation of the Americans with Disabilities Act," says PETER DAVID BLANCK, law professor at the University of Iowa and commissioner on the American Bar Association's Commission on Mental and Physical Disability Law.

SOUNDS OF SPACE PUT TO MUSIC (Columbus Dispatch, July 21)
For nearly four decades, University of Iowa astrophysicist DONALD GURNETT has analyzed and interpreted the solar system's chirps, whistles and grunts, all captured during dozens of unmanned space flights by sophisticated radio receivers he invented in the early 1960s. Besides the occasional request from broadcast journalists, Gurnett rarely thought his recordings could have a relevance beyond the world of astrophysics, let alone serve as the melodic and rhythmic accompaniment to an inventive twist in contemporary chamber music. Gurnett said: "I'm not a musician but I've spent my life studying the sounds and phenomenon of sound waves, so in a way we kind of speak the same language. I really didn't have a clue how or why you would set this stuff to music." Minimalist composer Terry Riley is putting the "stuff" to music, and the result is an 85-minute multimedia piece called "Sun Rings" which will be performed in concert halls in America and Europe. The Independent Online is part of a South African newspaper group. The Dispatch is based in Columbus, Ohio.

REILEY RUNS LOCAL UNION (Minneapolis Star Tribune, July 21)
Mollie Reiley runs Teamsters Local 2000, the union that represents more than 11,500 flight attendants from Northwest and Sun Country Airlines. On July 1, Teamsters President James P. Hoffa ousted the local union's executive board and appointed Reiley to serve as Local 2000 trustee. Hoffa removed the union officers because they did not forcefully oppose an organizing effort by some Northwest flight attendants to break from the Teamsters and form an independent union, the Professional Flight Attendants Association. She attended high school in Minnetonka, Minn and then went off to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. She was a nursing major, but then decided she was more interested in merchandising. After three years, she decided to leave college.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/468/3093154.html

GURNETT'S SPACE SOUNDS SET TO MUSIC (Deseret News, July 21)
For nearly four decades, University of Iowa astrophysicist DONALD GURNETT has analyzed and interpreted the solar system's chirps, whistles and grunts, all captured during dozens of unmanned space flights by sophisticated radio receivers he invented in the early 1960s. Besides the occasional request from broadcast journalists, Gurnett rarely thought his recordings could have a relevance beyond the world of astrophysics, let alone serve as the melodic and rhythmic accompaniment to an inventive twist in contemporary chamber music. Gurnett said: "I'm not a musician but I've spent my life studying the sounds and phenomenon of sound waves, so in a way we kind of speak the same language. I really didn't have a clue how or why you would set this stuff to music." Minimalist composer Terry Riley is putting the "stuff" to music, and the result is an 85-minute multimedia piece called "Sun Rings." The Kronos Quartet will perform it in concert halls in America and Europe this fall, including its Oct. 26 premiere in Iowa City.
http://deseretnews.com/dn/view/0,1249,405018729,00.html

DAMASIO DISCUSSES NEUROSCIENCE ETHICS (Chicago Tribune, July 21)
As the revolution in brain research rolls on faster than anyone anticipated, it is opening the door to mind-bending possibilities. Many of them seem scary even to the scientists themselves. That's why a group of prominent neuroscientists, philosophers, psychiatrists, ethicists and others met recently at the historic Presidio in San Francisco overlooking the Golden Gate Bridge. Their mission was to find a way to alert the world to the coming promises and dangers arising out of science's growing power to understand and manipulate the brain. "How can we with neuroscience help in understanding ethics? How is it that biology produces what we call social behavior and ethical rules?" asked Dr. ANTONIO DAMASIO, head of neurology at the University of Iowa College of Medicine. Damasio is conducting pioneering brain imaging studies showing that damage to a certain part of the brain from a stroke or injury can cause a person to do the wrong thing, even though he knows the difference between right and wrong.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/opinion/perspective/chi-0207210215jul21.story

UI STUDIES SUICIDE AMONG ELDERLY (Baltimore Sun, July 21)
Concerned that most Americans are unaware of the high rate of suicide among senior citizens, researchers have issued a wake-up call to the elderly, their families, caregivers and physicians. Leading scientists, in a journal published this month, have taken a closer look at the reasons people 65 and older commit suicide at a higher rate than any other age group. Although older Americans make up about 13 percent of the population, they account for nearly 20 percent of all suicides. The new research confirms what scientists have long identified as contributing factors to elderly suicide: depression, mental impairments, better access to firearms and social isolation. One study completed at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF MEDICINE found that in addition to depression, lack of social interactions and poor sleep appear to be indications that a senior citizen may take his own life.
http://www.sunspot.net/news/local/midatlantic/bal-ca.suicide00jul21.story

UI CONTRIBUTES TO TECHNOLOGY CORRIDOR (USA Today, July 19)
A long-term contract to supply Proctor & Gamble a unique line of molded plastic shampoo bottles is a big reason Alpla is building a 58,000-square-foot factory on the east side of Iowa City. But proximity to its sole customer is just part of the reason the Austrian-based bottle maker selected eastern Iowa to establish a Midwestern foothold, said Joe Gregos, the company's operations manager. Executives shopped throughout the Midwest's industrial centers before deciding the business corridor between Iowa City and Cedar Rapids offered the customer base, skilled labor pool and central location to support growth in several major Midwestern markets. Economic development officials in Iowa City and Cedar Rapids are banking that Alpla is just the latest corporation to set up shop in what's being marketed under the trademarked title: The Cedar Rapids/Iowa City Technology Corridor. Corporate leaders such as Proctor & Gamble, Oral B Laboratories, Quaker Oats and Ralston Foods on the personal product side and Rockwell Collins and Skyworks Solutions in the electronics area also are viewed as magnets, serving as proof of the corridor's economic viability, skilled workforce and enticing economic opportunities for smaller companies, like Alpla, Raso said. The corridor also is strongly represented by data and financial services, insurance, educational testing and biotechnology companies attracted to or spun out of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, officials said.
http://www.usatoday.com/tech/news/2002-07-19-iowa-technology_x.htm

WINOKUR QUOTED IN SMALLPOX STORY (Omaha World-Herald, July 19)
In a week's time, 55 Iowans took a shot for the rest of the country. Those people, plus another 50 being screened for eligibility, offered to be vaccinated with smallpox as part of a national study that will figure into the debate about how the United States prepares for the possibility of smallpox-toting terrorists. "Some of the people we've screened actually wanted the vaccine because they were concerned" about their safety if smallpox is deliberately released, said Dr. PATRICIA WINOKUR, a co-investigator at the University of Iowa. The university has moved rapidly in finding and vaccinating participants. Thirty-six more people were expected to be vaccinated Thursday.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=451721

RAPTOR CENTER RELOCATES OSPREYS (Omaha World-Herald, July 19)
Four ospreys were relocated from Wisconsin to a nature area about nine miles north of Iowa City last week in an attempt to reintroduce the birds into Iowa. The large, hawk-like birds will remain in a tower at the Macbride Nature Recreation Area for as much as eight weeks before being released, said Jodeane Cancilla, director of the Macbride Raptor Project. The number of ospreys decreased in Iowa because their natural habitat and diet of fish had diminished. The Raptor Project is a nonprofit organization devoted to preservation of Iowa's raptors and their natural environment. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Kirkwood Community College co-sponsor the project, which was founded in 1985. Most of the operating fees come from donations, Cancilla said.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=453465

REGENTS APPROVE BUDGETS (Omaha World Herald, July 19)
The Board of Regents, State of Iowa on Thursday approved budgets for Iowa's three public universities, each of which begins the fiscal year with less money than the previous year despite double-digit tuition increases. The presidents of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Iowa State University and the University of Northern Iowa each complained that significant reductions in state support have threatened educational quality. The Legislature, over the past two years, has trimmed $56 million from the University of Iowa, $50 million from Iowa State and $16.5 million from Northern Iowa.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=451708

REGENTS APPOINT HOSPITAL CEO (Omaha World Herald, July 19)
The top candidate from a four-month nationwide search for a new CEO at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics has officially been given the job. On Thursday the Board of Regents, State of Iowa unanimously approved hiring DONNA KATEN-BAHENSKY as the top administrator of a hospital and network of clinics with a 2002-03 operating budget of more than $575 million and serving an average of 3,000 patients per day. "I'm very excited and honored," she said. "In the search process, I met many people who ... spoke highly of the University of Iowa. And I was sold from the visits I made here" during the interview process. Katen-Bahensky is the executive vice president and chief operating officer of the Virginia Commonwealth University Health System. She said there are striking similarities between her present job and the challenges she faces in the new post. Both are large teaching hospitals, but University Hospitals has a slightly bigger budget, bed capacity and staff size. "We all share the same financial challenges, the high cost of prescription drugs, supplies and the difficulty in recruiting nurses," she said.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=451707

REGENTS PRESIDENTS EARN 2.5 PERCENT RAISE (Omaha World Herald, July 19)
Presidents of Iowa's three state universities and the top administrators at two special education schools were each given 2.5 percent raises by the Board of Regents, State of Iowa on Thursday. "I only wish it could be more," said Clarkson Kelly, board member from Charles City. The salaries for fiscal year 2002-03 include $281,875 for SANDY BOYD, interim president, University of Iowa.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=451709

UI LAB CONFIRMS WEST NILE VIRUS IN BIRDS (Omaha World Herald, July 19)
Two dead birds found in Scott County this week have tested positive for West Nile virus, health officials said Thursday. A crow found in central Davenport and a blue jay found in a rural, northeast area of the county were collected Monday and tested at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HYGIENIC LAB.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=451699

LINDER COMMENTS ON PAPERBOYS (Wall St. Journal, July 19)
The paperboy long ago became an American icon, and generations of kids have gained important experience -- not to mention income -- delivering newspapers. But largely unknown is what happens when a child gets hurt or killed delivering newspapers. In most cases, the newspaper is not responsible for paying medical bills or providing workers' compensation benefits. The industry has argued for decades that the children aren't employees, but are "little merchants,'' independent contractors who buy papers wholesale and sell them at retail prices. This independent status saves newspapers money on workers' compensation insurance and essentially absolves them of any responsibility for the welfare of their child deliverers -- a position that dismays some legal and workplace experts. MARC LINDER, a University of Iowa law professor who has studied the issue, says he can't "understand how anyone with legal training can accept that a 13-year-old boy is running a delivery service like UPS.''
http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB1027028059997916200.djm,00.html

UI PART OF NEW LANGUAGE COURSE (Chronicle of Higher Education, July 19)
Iowa's three state universities -- Iowa State University, the University of Iowa, and the University of Northern Iowa -- have formed a partnership to teach Eastern European languages and culture via an Internet-based videoconferencing system. The Iowa Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies Distance Learning Consortium is scheduled to offer its first courses next spring. The consortium will offer language courses in Czech, Polish, and Serbo-Croatian. The three institutions banded together to preserve their instruction in Slavic studies and related fields, says RUSSELL VALENTINO, an associate professor of Russian at the University of Iowa who directs the new partnership. He is also director of the university's Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies. The pressures that drove the Iowa universities to use distance education as a means of relief are felt by all language departments, not just those that teach less-common tongues, says MADELEINE M. HENRY, an associate professor of classical studies at Iowa State who is chairwoman of the department of foreign languages and literatures there. "If we want to teach these languages, we have to get students in the classroom," says STEVEN L. HOCH, an associate provost who is dean of international programs at the University of Iowa. "We need a new model."
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v48/i45/45a03103.htm

GURNETT’S SPACE SOUNDS SET TO MUSIC (YahooNews, July 18)
For nearly four decades, University of Iowa astrophysicist DONALD GURNETT has analyzed and interpreted the solar system's chirps, whistles and grunts, all captured during dozens of unmanned space flights by sophisticated radio receivers he invented in the early 1960s. Aside from the occasional request from broadcast journalists, Gurnett rarely thought that his recordings could have a relevance beyond the world of astrophysics, let alone serve as the melodic and rhythmic accompaniment to an inventive twist in contemporary chamber music. "I'm not a musician, but I've spent my life studying the sounds and phenomenon of sound waves ... so in a way we kind of speak the same language," said Gurnett, flitting through dozens of cassettes containing 40 years of recordings. "But I really didn't have a clue how or why you would set this stuff to music." Minimalist composer Terry Riley is putting the "stuff" to music, and the result is an 85-minute multimedia piece called "Sun Rings." The Kronos Quartet will perform it in concert halls in America and Europe this fall, including its Oct. 26 premiere in Iowa City.
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/ap/20020719/ap_wo_en_po/arts_us_space_music_1

UI STUDENTS RAISE FUNDS FOR FDNY (St. Petersburg Times, July 18)
Local resident Jan Zaroski began selling T-shirts to neighbors after her daughter, Jessica, a business student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, explained her latest class assignment. The assignment for the entrepreneurial and new business formation class was to create a product the class could sell and then donate the profits. Originally the students planned to donate the profits to the victims of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, but decided instead to do something to improve the condition of the firehouses in New York City. The class created a T-shirt with the FDNY logo printed on the front and a picture of Engine 55 with the words "Heroes Wanted" printed on the back.
http://proxy.lib.uiowa.edu/login?url=http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=f50493a4aea00b4c62172a60d617e2c0&_docnum=3&wchp=dGLbVlb-lSlAl&_md5=5755213ac7424586569e7a6545f3a8fb

UI STUDY LINKS PERSONALITY, DEATH (Fort Worth Star-Telegram, July 18)
Can pessimism shorten your life? A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study for the National Institutes of Health says that this is possible if you have a serious chronic illness. The study said that if you're a take-charge, conscientious person, you're more likely to live longer. A version of the same story also ran July 8 in the SAN ANTONIO EXPRESS-NEWS in Texas.

MCLEOD'S ATTEMPT TO 'SELL SOUL' CITED IN BOOK (Times-Picayune, July 17)
A story about an upcoming book about eBay says the book cites the case of KEMBREW MCLEOD, a University of Iowa communications professor who tried to sell his soul on eBay (as a prank) in March 2000. The Times-Picayune is based in New Orleans, La.

BLUMBERG COMMENTS ON TEMPERATURE (Washington Post, July 17)
An article about the 100th anniversary of the invention of air conditioning notes that few people can agree on an optimum temperature. "People don't fight about oxygen," says MARK BLUMBERG, a biopsychologist at the University of Iowa. "They don't fight about gravity. Because these things don't vary. But they do fight about temperature. Everybody has their own perfect temperature." So, what's the real root of the problem? Why, physiologically, are some people always cold and some people always hot? There isn't a whole lot of science on this issue, but Blumberg -- who is an expert in body temperature, and how bodies acclimate themselves to temperature change -- thinks a lot of it goes back to environment. Grow up in the South, in hot temperatures, and your body is trained to handle heat. You like it warm in a room, because cold is not what you're used to. Grow up in the North, deal with snow, ice, chills, and you are more adept at operating in the cold. According to Blumberg's book "Body Heat: Temperature and Life on Earth" (Harvard University Press), 93 percent of homes in the hotter Southern regions of the United States now have air conditioning. The numbers are significantly lower -- in the 60s -- for the North. So now that the average Northerner is getting exposed to heat more frequently and for more sustained periods than the average Southerner, what happens? "We really don't know yet," Blumberg says. "It's only been an issue for about 50 years, so it hasn't been studied enough."But his own marriage provides a hint. He's from Washington, D.C., from muggy, hot summers. So he should be okay with the heat, right? Wrong. He grew up with a mother crazy for air conditioning. Open windows were banned. So as an adult, he wants his house crisp and cold and is sensitive to heat. His wife grew up in an Indiana household with no air conditioning. She had breezes as a child, cool air. She wants the windows open. Even in the heat of summer. "My wife is always opening the windows, and I'm always closing them," Blumberg says, laughing. "The idea of letting beautiful, cool, non-human air out is a sin against nature for me. My wife thinks an open window is essential."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A15955-2002Jul16.html

UI GETS $130,000 IN PILOT GRANTS (Omaha World-Herald, July 17)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SCIENCES RESEARCH CENTER has awarded $130,000 in pilot grants for environmental health research. Studies funded by the grants include work with endotoxins, water-related diseases in West Africa, selenium levels and their association with prostate cancer, chemical sensitivity and two studies related to air quality surrounding factory farms.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=449705

U-M TO PAY COLEMAN AT LEAST $3.4 MILLION (Omaha World-Herald, July 17)
The University of Michigan will pay MARY SUE COLEMAN at least $3.4 million if she keeps the job of president for five years. Now in her final weeks as the University of Iowa's 18th president, Coleman, 58, was named Michigan's 13th and first female president in May, a position she assumes on Aug. 1. Her annual salary at Iowa was $275,000. The Michigan Board of Regents on Monday unanimously approved a five-year contract that sets Coleman's first-year base salary at $475,000. The contract also provides for payment of $375,000 in deferred compensation, $75,000 a year, if she remains Michigan president through July 31, 2007. The contract also guarantees a $500,000 "retention bonus" after five years on the job and provides for $117,700 in contributions over those five years to a 403(b) retirement account.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=449706
A similar story ran July 16 on the website of the ANN ARBOR NEWS in Michigan.
http://www.mlive.com/news/aanews/index.ssf?/xml/story.ssf/html_standard.xsl?/base/news-1/1026828607126030.xml

ANTCZAK COMMENTS ON BUSH SPEECH (Los Angeles Times, July 16)
Sometimes it's difficult explaining things to the American people, especially when it comes to complex topics such as the economy. But President Bush made plain Monday the reason behind the sad state of the U.S. stock market, which recently hit a five-year low: It's the bingeing, stupid. "America must get rid of the hangover that we now have as a result of the binge, the economic binge, we just went through," Bush told business leaders at the University of Alabama at Birmingham on Monday. This isn't the first time a U.S. president has used the alcohol metaphor in reference to the economy. Both Gerald Ford and Ronald Reagan made similar comparisons during their tenures, said FREDERICK J. ANTCZAK, a University of Iowa professor who has studied presidential rhetoric. Presidents also have been fond of comparing a bad economy to an overheated engine, Antczak said. "The hangover talk is common anytime there's a gust in the economy that slows things down," he said. "Presidents feel the populous is acquainted with this, and they are usually right." http://www.latimes.com/features/lifestyle/la-lv-bush16jul16.story

ROBINSON FINDINGS ON DEPRESSION EXPLAINED (News Tribune, July 15)
Using PET scans to explore the trail of damage in the brains of patients who have lost their zest for life as a result of stroke or head trauma, Dr. ROBERT G. ROBINSON believes he has discovered the dark lair where depression resides. The findings by the chief of psychiatry at the University of Iowa College of Medicine, if borne out, could help explain the millions of depressions in people who have suffered brain injury or strokes or who have vascular dementia, Parkinson's disease or other mental disorders. And it could shed light on the physical changes in the brain that may typify all depressions, which affect as many as 1 in 10 Americans each year. … New studies show that it may be possible to prevent depression after a stroke, said Dr. RICARDO JORGE, a University of Iowa neuropsychiatrist. Giving patients antidepressants immediately after a stroke reduces their risk of depression from 20 percent to 10 percent. The antidepressants used in the study, nortriptyline and citalopram, were compared with a placebo. The Tribune is based in Tacoma, Wash.

KIENZLE COMMENTS ON ONLINE CONSULTING (Modern Physician, July 15)
Medem, the online communications hub supported by 44 medical societies, has begun a nationwide push to convince physicians to consult with patients via the Internet -— for pay. Patients can log onto a physicians Medem site, then enter credit card or other payment information before sending a request. Physician users, who set their own charges, may choose to override the payment mechanism for simple requests. "The routine things that normally would be done on the phone with no charge, I would anticipate certainly in my own practice are not going to be charged for: prescription requests, scheduling requests, quick questions, quick follow-up on labs, that sort of thing," says cardiologist MICHAEL KIENZLE, M.D., chief technology officer at the University of Iowa Health System in Iowa City.

CHRISTENSEN CITES MIND-BODY LINK (Dallas Morning News, July 15)
Researchers who study connections between mind and body hope that one day, psychologists may become as familiar to doctors' offices as stethoscopes. Researchers have examined links between the brain and illness for decades, but laboratory advances and statistical sophistication have created a wealth of data during the past decade. New data even suggest that certain personality types, not just clinical conditions like depression, can affect a person's health. Researchers from the University Of Iowa, led by ALAN CHRISTENSEN, UI professor of psychology, found that patients with certain personality types were significantly more likely to die than their counterparts. People who ranked high on a scale called "neuroticism" had a 37.5 percent higher mortality rate than the rest of the group. People who scored low on a test of "conscientiousness" had a 36.5 percent higher mortality rate. A patient's personality may one day be incorporated into the whole medical assessment, Dr. Christensen hopes, although he acknowledges that psychologists have often had a difficult time convincing their medical brethren. "Many health psychologists would tell you it's been a bit of an uphill battle, but I tend to be one of the optimistic ones," he says. Medical students usually aren't coached in counseling, he says, because they have more important things to learn. When people go into an emergency room with a bleeding artery, they don't want doctors to ask them about feelings. "You want them to stop the bleeding and suture the artery," he says. "There's a reason they're trained to think that way."
http://www.dallasnews.com/texasliving/stories/071502dnlivmindbody.c00ad.html

PERSONALITY, HEALTH LINKED (Times of India, July 15)
Imagine a scenario in which Ebenezer Scrooge, the cantankerous reprobate from A Christmas Carol, and the apple-cheeked Mr. Pickwick from Pickwick Papers by Charles Dickens were both to contract Tiny Tim's chronic kidney ailment. (Tiny Tim is Bob Cratchit's ailing son in the former classic.) Of the two, Scrooge would be the more likely candidate for an early demise because of his pessimistic personality, claims a new study by University of Iowa scientists. Mr. Pickwick, on the other hand, with his sunny, take-charge attitude, would be more likely to live longer, the scientists contend. In other words, patients suffering from a serious chronic ailment are better off thinking like Tiger Woods than like Woody Allen. In the study, reported in the latest issue of Health Psychology, lead author ALAN CHRISTENSEN, a professor of psychology and internal medicine at the University of Iowa, says, "We have confirmed what research and clinical work and many other people have speculated, that there is a definite link between personality style and physical health.'' In their study of 174 men and women who suffered from chronic kidney disease, the researchers found those who were prone to excessive worry and general anxiety were nearly 40 per cent more than likely to die during a four-year period than the average patient.
http://proxy.lib.uiowa.edu/login?url=http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=e21e45c935cfd5c3833ebc68b139491f&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLSzV-lSlzV&_md5=24ad21aa38812d6c20b9276003eb6ad4
The story also appeared in the ECONOMIC TIMES OF INDIA on July 15 at
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WRITER'S WORKSHOP TEACHER HAS NEW NOVEL (Commercial Appeal, July 14)
William Price Fox, author of humorous fiction works "Ruby Red," "Southern Fried" and "Dixiana Moon," returns with a new novel, "Wild Blue Yonder" which he will be signing at three regional bookstores this week. Fox, a native of South Carolina, taught in the Writers' Workshop at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and worked in Los Angeles as a screenwriter. He teaches creative writing at University of South Carolina in Columbia. The Commercial Appeal is published in Memphis, Tenn.
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COLEMAN TAKES SECOND TOUR OF U-M CAMPUS (Ann Arbor News, July 14)
This past weekend MARY SUE COLEMAN made her second visit to the University of Michigan campus since being approved and announced as U-M's 13th president on May 29. Coleman, who has served seven years as president at the University of Iowa, combined getting-to-know meetings with deans and senior executives Friday and Saturday with a chance to walk around downtown in the perfect summer weather and drive around the city with her husband, Ken. She followed Friday afternoon's visit to North Campus and the School of Engineering with dinner on Main Street and a stroll through a classic car show that flooded the downtown with people. Several people recognized her and congratulated her on the new job. "There were throngs of people," she said. "The place was just packed. I thought, 'Wow, is this neat."'
http://www.mlive.com/news/aanews/index.ssf?/xml/story.ssf/html_standard.xsl?/base/news-1/1026641442257512.xml

COUPLE COMPLAINS OF COLLEGE COSTS (Chicago Tribune, July 14)
In response to an editorial by Stephen D. Schutt, president of Lake Forest College ("College doors are open to all qualified students," July 2), an Illinois couple writes in a letter to the editor that "As parents who are currently suffering from college sticker shock for the third time, we totally agree with the Tribune's assessment that a college education may very soon be out of reach for most Americans. … In September, we will have two students in two colleges, one in a Catholic university and the second in an out-of-state public school. Our youngest child was admitted to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, University of St. Thomas and Marquette University. All of these schools said they would make it financially possible for students to attend their institutions. Annual tuition, fees, room and board, and personal expenses at these schools ranged from $16,000 to $28,000. After reviewing our request for financial aid, the University of Illinois offered no aid; the greatest amount of aid offered by the other schools was a $5,000 grant plus a $2,600 student loan. We were expected to pay between $16,000 and $20,000 for our daughter's first year of college on top of more than $12,000 for our son's last year."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/opinion/letters/chi-0207140240jul14.story

CONROY RECALLS WORKSHOP'S START (Chicago Tribune, July 14)
A story about the proliferation of writing programs in universities across the country says that when the University of Iowa began the nation's first graduate creative writing program in 1936, plenty of eyebrows shot skyward, said FRANK CONROY, director of the Iowa program. "The concept was very radical at the time--the idea that you'd accept a thesis of creative writing for an academic degree. It's commonplace now, but then it was viewed with much suspicion." The controversy arose in part from the mystery that has always encircled creativity. We think of creativity as something innate, as an inherent talent one either has or doesn't have. You can learn to lay a straight line of bricks or cook a pot roast, this thinking goes, but you can't learn to write a sonnet. You're either born with the ability to write a sonnet or you're out of luck. Creativity is ephemeral, mystical, a thing of light and shadow and nuance.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/specials/chi-0207140356jul14.story

DREHER: NURSE RETENTION 'VITAL' (Chicago Tribune, July 14)
One of the nation's leading nurse educators has issued a call to resolve what she terms "severe crises" in the nursing field: shortages of registered nurses and faculty to teach future caregivers. "We need a serious infusion of people in this field," said Carolyn Williams, immediate past president of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing in Washington, D.C., and dean of the College of Nursing at the University of Kentucky in Lexington. … Although MELANIE DREHER, dean of the School of Nursing at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, supports stepping up recruitment, she stresses the importance of retaining nurses. "You can recruit until the cows come home, but it is nurse retention that is so vital," she said. "If nurses were paid more and their work environment was improved, we would have no problem recruiting students."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/specials/chi-0207140360jul14.story

UI CITED IN STORY ON COMMUNITY COLLEGES (Omaha World-Herald, July 14)
An apparent hole in the relationship between Iowa's community colleges and four-year universities could be a gain for the University of Nebraska at Omaha. UNO is working on a transfer agreement with Des Moines Area Community College that would allow students who graduate from DMACC's two-year information-technology program to transfer to UNO to complete their four-year degree in the business information field. The partnership between UNO and DMACC has sent a ripple through Iowa's academic circles. Iowa's universities are not set up to accept community-college transfers in vocational and technical fields. David England, president of DMACC, said his college developed the partnership with UNO because Iowa universities make few attempts to allow community-college students to transfer credits. Community colleges in Iowa have made headway with the University of Northern Iowa, but the state's two larger campuses -- Iowa State University and UNIVERSITY OF IOWA -- don't have standard transfer agreements for community-college students, England said.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=447258

ATHLETICS SEEKS ADDITIONAL FUNDING (Omaha World-Herald, July 14)
Some University of Iowa faculty members and students are angry that officials want to increase the athletics department budget while academic departments are being cut. Athletics administrators are proposing to increase the athletics department budget 12.6 percent, while academic departments are being cut $2.7 million. University funding to the athletics department would go up about $274,000, making the university's contribution more than $2.4 million. The state Board of Regents would have to approve the increase. Administrators said the additional funding is needed to offset the rising cost of scholarships and salary increases for coaches in women's athletics. The athletics department income is projected to increase by 15.4 percent, or $2.2 million, largely through higher ticket prices. "It's ridiculous to fund athletics at this rate when the quality of education at the UI is being compromised," said a history professor, KATHERINE TACHAU. "I feel dismayed by the increase." DAN ANDERSON, a member of the athletics board, said the added support from the university is essential to compensate for the 18.5 percent tuition increase taking effect in the fall. A former student government vice president, DAN ROSSI, said education should always come before athletics, particularly when some of the money in question comes from tuition.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=38&u_sid=447418

UI STUDIES SUICIDE AMONG ELDERLY (Omaha World-Herald, July 14)
Concerned that most Americans are unaware of the high rate of suicide among senior citizens, researchers have issued a wake-up call to the elderly, their families, caregivers and physicians. Leading scientists, in a journal published this month, have taken a closer look at the reasons people 65 and older commit suicide at a higher rate than any other age group. Although older Americans make up about 13 percent of the population, they account for nearly 20 percent of all suicides. The new research confirms what scientists have long identified as contributing factors to elderly suicide: depression, mental impairments, better access to firearms and social isolation. One study completed at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF MEDICINE found that in addition to depression, lack of social interactions and poor sleep appear to be indications that a senior citizen may take his own life.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=54&u_sid=446690
The story originally appeared in the BERGEN RECORD in New Jersey.

UNION LEADER ATTENDED UI (Minneapolis Star Tribune, July 13)
A feature on Mollie Reiley, who runs Teamsters Local 2000, the union that represents more than 11,500 flight attendants from Northwest and Sun Country Airlines, says that last week the 52-year-old Reiley received a framed certificate marking her 30 years of service with Northwest. Reiley grew up as a doctor's daughter, attended high school in Minnetonka and then went off to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. She was a nursing major, but then decided she was more interested in merchandising. After three years, she decided to leave college. "I wasn't really sure what I wanted to do," she said. Reiley worked in a retail store and a florist shop and then, on a whim, applied to Northwest.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/535/3056791.html

UI STUDENT IN LAWSUIT OVER BAR FIRE (Omaha World-Herald, July 13)
An Illinois woman who suffered the most severe burns and injuries when a fiery bar trick flamed out of control in April has joined two others in suing the nightclub's former owner. Tom Riley, the Cedar Rapids attorney representing the three victims, also said he has obtained an amateur videotape showing staff at Et Cetera performing the stunt three weeks before his clients were injured. Riley said he will turn a copy of the tape over to Johnson County Attorney J. Patrick White. White has charged the bar's former general manager, Troy Kline, with reckless use of fire, a serious misdemeanor. Deanine Busche, a 21-year-old former UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student from Schaumburg, Ill., suffered the most serious injuries. She filed a lawsuit in Johnson County District Court this week claiming the bar was negligent.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=446529

UI PLUMBER'S MURDERER DENIED CLEMENCY (Omaha World-Herald, July 13)
Gov. Tom Vilsack has denied a request for clemency by a former Iowa City insurance agent serving life in prison for the killing of a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA plumber. Robert Kern admitted making "stupid mistakes" and acknowledged his guilt, although he contended he had a minor role among those who plotted to kill Ady Jensen, 39, in 1979. Kern is serving a life sentence at the Anamosa Correctional Facility. Jensen was shot to death on April 14, 1979, at his parents' rural West Branch home. Kern, 56, and his ex-wife, Judy Kern, were convicted of first-degree murder in October 1979 for scheming with Jensen's wife, Jeanne, to kill him. Andrew Jon Oglevie, an Illinois man charged as the contract killer, was acquitted in 1983.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=446573

UI GRAD GIVES $2.4 MILLION TO FIVE GROUPS (Omaha World-Herald, July 13)
Four local organizations and a national charity this week got the first installment of a $2.4 million estate left by a Maquoketa woman. Verda McClendon died at 94 in 2001. She left the money to be split among five organizations – each receiving $480,000. This week, a $200,000 distribution was made to the Maquoketa Public Library, the Jackson County Public Hospital Foundation, the American Diabetes Association, the Maquoketa Area Foundation and for two scholarships for Maquoketa and Delwood students. McClendon received degrees in chemistry from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, including her doctorate in 1932. She joined the Agricultural Research Service in Maryland.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=446614

UI OBSERVATORY UP FOR SALE (Omaha World-Herald, July 13)
University of Iowa officials don't expect many prospective buyers when they put an observatory up for sale. "It's a facility that's pretty much out-of-date," said JOHN NEFF, a now-retired astronomer hired in 1965 by the Department of Physics and Astronomy to run the facility. "With the money it would take to upgrade the facility, you could buy a much larger telescope." The long-mothballed stargazing laboratory is 12 miles south of Iowa City near Riverside. The three-story, yellow brick building has yet to be appraised. The university plans to seek permission from the State Board of Regents to sell the observatory, which hasn't been used for 12 years. It was built during the 1964-65 school year and used as a field laboratory and research center. AL STROH, an administrator with Iowa's Facilities Services Group, said the facility will be sold later this year because it no longer serves any educational function. He said he had no idea how much the university could expect from the property.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=446799

COLEMAN COMMENTS ON SEARCH (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, July 12)
Worried that state public disclosure laws will drive away the best candidates for the presidency of the University of Minnesota, a member of the Board of Regents on Thursday suggested that the school refuse to abide by the law. Concern over the effect of state sunshine laws on the presidential search dominated the board's 90-minute discussion on replacing President Mark Yudof, who will become chancellor of the University of Texas in August. Around the nation, research universities have asked courts and legislatures to exempt presidential searches from public disclosure laws, arguing that the best candidates are already happily employed and won't apply unless they can interview in secret. This spring, after a change in state law, the University of Michigan hired away University of Iowa President MARY SUE COLEMAN in a closed process. Coleman said she wouldn't have considered the job if the process had been public.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/462/3054010.html

DES MOINES COUPLE DONATES $1.5 MILLION (Omaha World-Herald, July 12)
A Des Moines couple has given the University of Iowa money to help build a state-of-the art football practice complex. Ronald and Margaret Kenyon donated $1.5 million through the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA FOUNDATION. In recognition of the gift, the university will ask the Board of Regents to name the facility in their honor, officials said. The complex will be near Kinnick Stadium and feature two full-sized grass practice fields and an oversized artificial turf field. The fields will be lighted so players can prepare for night games and coordinate their practice schedule around classes. The Kenyons, owners of Ronald Kenyon Construction Co. in West Des Moines, are longtime Hawkeye supporters and have held season tickets to Iowa football games for more than 40 years. The total cost of the project is $1.9 million. Construction is expected to begin next month.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=38&u_sid=445736

COLEMAN: UI TO CUT MORE POSITIONS (Omaha World-Herald, July 12)
The 2003-04 budget crafted by the University of Iowa calls for the elimination of more than 300 teaching-related jobs, an increased student-to-teacher ratio and higher prices for medical care at University Hospitals. University President MARY SUE COLEMAN said the preliminary budget, released Thursday, reflects difficult choices at a time when money is tight. "We got through this budget process the best way we possibly could," said Coleman, who will leave Iowa City in August to become president of the University of Michigan. The university's budget totals $1.036 billion, distributed among 14 divisions, including the general university fund, hospitals and clinics and the state hygienic lab. The Iowa Board of Regents will vote on the budget next week at its meeting in Cedar Falls.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=445757

BOWLSBY COMMENTS ON TITLE IX (Chronicle of Higher Education, July 12)
Late last month, Education Secretary Roderick R. Paige announced that he had formed a Commission on Opportunities in Athletics to study Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, which bans gender discrimination at institutions receiving federal funds. The 15-member group includes professors, athletics administrators, a coach, former athletes, and women's sports advocates. The commission's charge requires it to answer eight questions, including "Are Title IX standards for assessing equal opportunity in athletics working to promote opportunities for male and female athletes?" and "How should activities such as cheerleading or bowling factor into the analysis of equitable opportunities?" To members of the commission, that's a lot of ground to cover in a short period of time. "What's included in the charge seems to give us pretty broad license over all aspects of the law and the enforcement policies," said ROBERT A. BOWLSBY, athletics director at the University of Iowa. "I don't think people are going to go into it with preconceived notions of what should or shouldn't happen."
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v48/i44/44a03801.htm

UI SMART PROGRAM SUCCESSFUL (Chronicle of Higher Education, July 12)
A budget shortfall of $121-million can drain the energy out of an institution, literally as well as figuratively. But the University of Iowa has turned to an old-fashioned idea to restore at least some of that energy: a suggestion box. To deal with both falling morale and the soaring deficit, university officials have created the online program UI SMART ("Unique Ideas Save Money And Reward Thriftiness") to seek help from faculty and staff members in improving efficiency and conserving resources on the campus. Winning suggestions -- those that the university adopts -- earn the tipster a cool $100. There are, of course, a few that have not been embraced, like "Get rid of my supervisor" and "Turn off all lights on campus." But over the past year, 14 bright thinkers have netted cash for such ideas as reusing envelopes for campus mail, using illumination with light-sensitive timers on the tennis courts, and shutting down two escalators, which alone will save $1,300.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v48/i44/44a00903.htm

BUCKWALTER COMMENTS ON KNEE SURGERY (New York Times, July 11)
A popular operation for arthritis of the knee worked no better than a sham procedure in which patients were sedated while surgeons pretended to operate, researchers are reporting today. The operation — arthroscopic surgery for the pain and stiffness caused by osteoarthritis — is done on at least 225,000 middle-age and older Americans each year at a cost of more than a billion dollars to Medicare, the Department of Veterans Affairs and private insurers. It involves making three small incisions in the knee; inserting an arthroscope, a thin instrument that allows surgeons to see the joint; and then flushing debris from the knee or shaving rough areas of cartilage from the joint and then flushing it. In the study, to be published today in The New England Journal of Medicine, investigators at the Houston Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Baylor College of Medicine report that while patients often said they felt better after the surgery, their improvement was just wishful thinking. Tests of knee functions revealed that the operation had not helped, and those who got the placebo surgery reported feeling just as good as those who had had the real operation. In an accompanying editorial, Dr. David T. Felson of Boston University and Dr. JOSEPH BUCKWALTER of the University of Iowa note that if there were large beneficial effects from the surgery, the study should have found them. "Although the study may not have been large enough to permit the detection of any small effects," they wrote, "the data presented do not suggest that there were any."
http://www.nytimes.com/2002/07/11/health/11KNEE.html
A Reuters version of this story appeared July 11 on YahooNews:
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/nm/20020711/hl_nm/knees_arthritis_dc_1

BARRON COMMENTS ON WATER DAMAGE (Omaha World Herald, July 11)
Several historical documents were destroyed when a drainpipe ruptured during a roof replacement project at a building on the University of Iowa campus. The pipe burst Tuesday at Calvin Hall, damaging electronic equipment and destroying archived materials in the admissions office below. "Some of the documents were of historical interest," said MICHAEL BARRON, the University of Iowa director of admissions. "It's sad to see them lost in such an unexpected manner." University books, recruiting materials and honors program brochures were among the items destroyed.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=444737

UI WINS GRANT FOR BRAIN RESEARCH (Omaha World Herald, July 11)
University of Iowa researchers studying how blood vessels in the brain function have received $6.8 million in federal money to continue their work, university officials say. The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, a division of the National Institutes of Health, awarded the five-year grant. It is the fourth time that the grant has been renewed for the university's Cerebral Vascular Biology Program. The program, started in 1987, is studying what happens to blood vessels that supply the brain when risk factors exist for carotid artery disease and stroke, officials said. "We focus on what goes wrong, that is, what abnormal mechanisms get activated and contribute to vascular disease," said Dr. FRANK FARACI, professor of internal medicine and lead investigator for the program. "We are also trying to better define the protective mechanisms that may work for a while but eventually fail with chronic disease."
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=444784

COLLEGE TUITIONS INCREASING (Washington Times, July 10)
College students nationwide are bracing for some of the biggest tuition increases in years. While public college tuition has risen slightly more than 4 percent annually over the past five years, many colleges are predicting increases in the double digits this fall — like the 19 percent increase forecast at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA or the 20 percent increase for out-of-state students at the University of South Florida. http://www.washtimes.com/national/20020710-926138.htm

UI STUDY SHOWS INFECTION REDUCTION (The Statesman, July 10)
A new study shows the way to reducing post-operative wound infections. In developing countries like India, the incidence of post-operative wound infection is quite high, because due to poverty and ignorance, proper postoperative patient care becomes very difficult here. As a consequence, in spite of a successful operation, patients die on many occasions from post-operative and hospital acquired (nosocomial) wound infections. Recently, a research paper published in the New England Journal of Medicine shed new light on the scenario of prevention of post-operative wound infections. A team of researchers from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA College of Medicine and Public Health, Iowa, and from the John Hopkins Medical Institution, Baltimore, wrote in their paper that if Staphylococcus aureus, a bacterium present in the common bacterial flora of the nasal mucous membrane, could be killed by antibiotic agents, the chance of any sort of surgical wound infection would greatly decrease. The Statesman is an English-language newspaper in India.
http://proxy.lib.uiowa.edu/login?url=http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=5c179e77e4eaa5f8a0473a82bbd996c7&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLSlS-lSlzV&_md5=a2af18ed1150dcff26c868d35a2c3139

TORNER COMMENTS ON HORMONE TRIAL (Omaha World-Herald, July 10)
Hormone replacement therapy will remain a common treatment for menopause, Nebraska and Iowa doctors said Tuesday, but it should be used selectively now that it has been linked to an increased risk of breast cancer, stroke and heart attacks. "The risk is small, but it's real," said Dr. JIM TORNER, a professor of epidemiology at the University of Iowa. Torner was co-investigator of the Iowa portion of a national study that tested the hormone estrogen when taken with progestin by menopausal women. The study, which had been scheduled to continue until 2005, was halted this week after it indicated that women taking the hormones were more likely to develop diseases such as breast cancer. The study involved more than 16,000 women, with half taking the hormones and half taking placebos. The Iowa portion involved 1,100 women. http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=57&u_sid=443604

DRAKE HIRES UI'S CALVERT (Omaha World-Herald, July 10)
Drake has gone to the University of Iowa for its new softball coach. The Bulldogs have hired RICH CALVERT, who's been an assistant coach with the Hawkeyes for the past six years. He replaces Emily Rottinghaus, who resigned at the end last season. Calvert helped Iowa to five NCAA Tournament appearances and two Women's College World Series.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=38&u_sid=443751

UI ASKED TO UPDATE FORECAST MODEL (Omaha World-Herald, July 10)
Gov. Tom Vilsack said Tuesday that he is revamping the way the state predicts how much money it will collect, adding more input from the business sector and coordinating more closely with national economists. Changes Vilsack announced included calling for the INSTITUTE FOR ECONOMIC RESEARCH AT THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to update the state's revenue forecasting model.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=443747

UI IS SMALLPOX VACCINATION TEST SITE (San Diego Union-Tribune, July 9)
With the jab of a needle, volunteers are being injected with a smallpox vaccine as part of government-sponsored experiments that come amid heightened fear of biological terrorism. About 330 volunteers will be inoculated with diluted doses of the vaccine over the next two weeks at four sites across the nation. Volunteers have already begun receiving the vaccine at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tenn., and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Baylor College of Medicine, in Houston, also is enrolling volunteers. Results are expected by mid-August. The tests are part of a $12.6 million National Institutes of Health grant awarded last year to Vanderbilt, which is overseeing the experiment and will enroll about 90 volunteers of its own.

TRIALS OF SMALLPOX VACCINE UNDERWAY (Orange County Register, July 9)
On Monday, July 8, scientists began testing the effectiveness of the 50-year-old smallpox vaccine supply on more than 300 volunteers in Oakland, Calif.; Iowa City, Iowa; Nashville; and Houston as part of the government's heightened post-Sept. 11 preparations for a biological attack. The trials in Oakland, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Vanderbilt University and Baylor College of Medicine will determine the side effects of the supply that was stored at Aventis Pasteur and whether it is still effective. If researchers find that it can be used, it could then be diluted to create an emergency supply large enough for the U.S., Canada and part of Mexico. The Register is based in Orange County, Calif.

 CHANG QUESTIONS BREAST IMPLANT DATA (Reuters, July 9)
Up to a quarter of women seeking saline breast implants for cosmetic reasons end up having replacement operations within five years, federal health advisers heard on Tuesday. The Food and Drug Administration will put the failure data in brochures given to patients before surgery but the advisory panel urged makers of the implants to better monitor their performance. FDA advisory committee members heard reports from saline implant makers Mentor Corp. and Inamed Corp.'s McGhan Medical unit. Mentor, which was criticized for its small study population, said 20 percent of women seeking breast augmentation sought a second operation, mainly because a hard capsule had formed around the implant. Women also requested new implants because they wanted to change sizes, or because of leaks and deflation, said Mentor. Mentor aimed to monitor its original 1,600 implant recipients, but said it had trouble tracking down those women, and only had full data on 60 patients. Panelists weren't impressed. "These are scientifically suspect data, just because of the low numbers," said PHYLLIS CHANG of the University of Iowa College of Medicine.
http://reuters.com/news_article.jhtml;jsessionid=B43KSKITD1VUOCRBAE0CFFAKEEATGIWD?type=sciencenews&StoryID=1182790
The same article also ran July 9 on YAHOO! NEWS.
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/nm/20020709/sc_nm/health_implants_dc_1

UI IS SMALLPOX VACCINATION TEST SITE (Minneapolis Star Tribune, July 9)
With the jab of a needle, volunteers are being injected with a smallpox vaccine as part of government-sponsored experiments that come amid heightened fear of biological terrorism. About 330 volunteers will be inoculated with diluted doses of the vaccine over the next two weeks at four sites across the nation. Volunteers have already begun receiving the vaccine at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tenn., and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Baylor College of Medicine, in Houston, also is enrolling volunteers. Results are expected by mid-August. The tests are part of a $12.6 million National Institutes of Health grant awarded last year to Vanderbilt, which is overseeing the experiment and will enroll about 90 volunteers of its own.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/670/3046344.html
The same article also ran July 9 on the website NANDO TIMES.
http://www.nandotimes.com/healthscience/story/461139p-3689721c.html

UI IS SMALLPOX VACCINATION TEST SITE (New York Times, July 9)
With the jab of a needle, volunteers are being injected with a smallpox vaccine as part of government-sponsored experiments that come amid heightened fear of biological terrorism. About 330 volunteers will be inoculated with diluted doses of the vaccine over the next two weeks at four sites across the nation. Volunteers have already begun receiving the vaccine at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tenn., and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Baylor College of Medicine, in Houston, also is enrolling volunteers. Results are expected by mid-August. The tests are part of a $12.6 million National Institutes of Health grant awarded last year to Vanderbilt, which is overseeing the experiment and will enroll about 90 volunteers of its own.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/national/AP-Smallpox-Vaccines.html
The Associated Press article also appeared in the WASHINGTON POST at http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A42489-2002Jul9.html, the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE at http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2002/07/08/state2013EDT0163.DTL, and YAHOO NEWS at: http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/ap/20020709/ap_on_he_me/smallpox_vaccines_1.

TRIALS OF SMALLPOX VACCINE UNDERWAY (Los Angeles Times, July 9)
On Monday, scientists began testing the effectiveness of the 50-year-old smallpox vaccine supply on more than 300 volunteers in Oakland, Calif.; Iowa City, Iowa; Nashville; and Houston as part of the government's heightened post-Sept. 11 preparations for a biological attack. The trials in Oakland, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Vanderbilt University and Baylor College of Medicine will determine the side effects of the supply that was stored at Aventis Pasteur and whether it is still effective. If researchers find that it can be used, it could then be diluted to create an emergency supply large enough for the U.S., Canada and part of Mexico.
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-na-pox9jul09.story

UI RESEARCH LINKS PERSONALITY, DEATH (HealthScoutNews, July 8)
If you have a serious chronic illness, a pessimistic personality may shorten your life. That's the conclusion of a new study by University of Iowa scientists that contends if you're a take-charge, conscientious person, you're more likely to live longer. "We have confirmed what research and clinical work and many other people have speculated, that there is a link between personality style and physical health," says ALAN CHRISTENSEN, a professor of psychology and internal medicine at the University of Iowa. He's the lead author of the study, which appears in the July issue of Health Psychology.
http://www.healthscoutnews.com/view.cfm?id=507941
This article also appeared July 8 on YahooNews.com.
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/hsn/20020708/hl_hsn/pessimism_can_be_kiss_of_death

STATE SUPPORT FOR UI DECLINING (Omaha World-Herald, July 8)
A story about the increase in summer enrollment at Iowa State University says the jump comes as the university battles budget constrictions. State support for Iowa State, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the University of Northern Iowa is expected to drop from 64 percent in 2000 to an expected 54 percent in 2003.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=441940

BOOK BY UI WORKSHOP'S OFFUTT REVIEWED (New York Times, July 7)
In author CHRIS OFFUTT's new book No Heroes: A Memoir of Coming Home, the tug of war between wanderlust and homesickness is pretty evenly matched. Offutt grew up in a Kentucky town so small it has lost its post office. He went to the local state college, smoked pot and slept in his car, and made his escape at 19. What came next -- stints as an actor, circus performer, swamp guide and successful writer- was the subject of his first memoir, ''The Same River Twice.'' But though the wide world eventually gave Offutt what he wanted, his soul still circled above eastern Kentucky. By the beginning of ''No Heroes,'' his homesickness has grown so severe that the sight of an Appalachian recipe can reduce him to tears. … In the end, Offutt leaves Kentucky just as the reader leaves his book: of two minds, both of them convinced yet irreconcilable. He gives his Malibu to a friend, buys a Lexus and trades his job at Morehead for more illustrious digs at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.nytimes.com/2002/07/07/books/review/07BILGERT.html

UI-DESIGNED COMPANIES LOSING MONEY (San Francisco Chronicle, July 7)
A group of health care companies designed by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA are averaging about $4 million in losses a year, The Des Moines Sunday Register reported. The businesses are plagued by low Medicaid and Medicare reimbursements, and by criticism for setting up clinics in towns where private clinics already existed, the newspaper said.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2002/07/07/national0207EDT0428.DTL

ROBINSON FINDINGS ON DEPRESSION EXPLAINED (Chicago Tribune, July 7)
Using PET scans to explore the trail of damage in the brains of patients who have lost their zest for life as a result of stroke or head trauma, Dr. ROBERT G. ROBINSON believes he has discovered the dark lair where depression resides. The findings by the chief of psychiatry at the University of Iowa College of Medicine, if borne out, could help explain the millions of depressions in people who have suffered brain injury or strokes or who have vascular dementia, Parkinson's disease or other mental disorders. And it could shed light on the physical changes in the brain that may typify all depressions, which affect as many as 1 in 10 Americans each year. … New studies show that it may be possible to prevent depression after a stroke, said Dr. RICARDO JORGE, a University of Iowa neuropsychiatrist. Giving patients antidepressants immediately after a stroke reduces their risk of depression from 20 percent to 10 percent. The antidepressants used in the study, nortriptyline and citalopram, were compared with a placebo.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/health/chi-0207070369jul07.story

SUICIDE AMONG SENIORS STUDIED (Charleston, W.V. Gazette, July 6)
Concerned that most Americans are unaware of the high rate of suicide among senior citizens, researchers have issued a wake-up call to the elderly, their families, caregivers, and physicians. Leading scientists, in a journal published this month, have taken a closer look at the reasons people 65 and older commit suicide at a higher rate than any other age group. Although older Americans make up about 13 percent of the population, they account for nearly 20 percent of all suicides. The new research confirms what scientists have long identified as contributing factors to elderly suicide: depression, mental impairments, better access to firearms, and social isolation. One study completed at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA ROY J. AND LUCILLE A. CARVER COLLEGE OF MEDICINE found that in addition to depression, lack of social interactions and poor sleep appear to be indications that a senior may take his own life.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=58ca4dc8c103091f78588e43c106ed8d&_docnum=3&wchp=dGLSlS-lSlzV&_md5=d1d2ed60aece1169f9d9548a7e9990e2

GURNETT'S SOUNDS OF SPACE PUT TO MUSIC (Omaha World-Herald, July 6)
They are the sounds made by lightning bolts as they bounce and arc across Jupiter's atmosphere. Or the stormlike rumblings of electron cyclotron waves flowing through pockets of ionized gas millions of miles from Earth. For nearly four decades, University of Iowa astrophysicist DONALD GURNETT has analyzed and interpreted the solar system's chirps, whistles and grunts, all captured during dozens of unmanned spaceflights by sophisticated radio receivers he invented in the early 1960s. The task of putting the sounds to music has been given to minimalist composer Terry Riley. The result is an 85-minute multimedia piece called "Sun Rings," which will be performed by the Kronos Quartet in concert halls in America and Europe this fall, including its Oct. 26 premiere in Iowa City. Producers also are collaborating with visual designer Willie Williams, who will build a stage set, coordinate lighting and project dozens of images of space from the archives of Voyager I and II missions. http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=440846

SCHROTT INVOLVED IN HORMONE THERAPY STUDY (Science Daily, July 5)
Although therapy with hormones was once thought to protect women's hearts after menopause, a University of California at San Francisco-led study has found that, at least for women with heart disease, estrogen plus progestin therapy does not reduce the risk of heart attack or death. The July 3, 2002 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) contains two articles with the results of the Heart and Estrogen/Progestin Replacement Follow-up Study (HERS II). One of the coauthors on a study of noncardiovascular disease outcomes was HELMUT SCHROTT, MD, University of Iowa.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/07/020705091810.htm

UI CITED IN STORY ON ONLINE CALENDARS (eWeek, July 5)
A columnist for the online technology publication discusses FirstClass, a high-end groupware and unified messaging server that won the Personal Productivity category in the publication's 2000 eWeek Excellence Awards program. FirstClass provides e-mail, contact management, calendaring, shared discussion forums and electronic forms features. The author said there are a handful of established stand-alone calendaring servers: Two that stood out as well-adopted in my research are Steltor's CorporateTime and SunONE Calendaring Server, but this market is having a tough time surviving against Exchange and Notes—it's the bundling factor at work. All the adopters of these packages I found were big universities (the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, University of California at Irvine, Cornell University and so on), places that needed cross-platform support and likely already had e-mail systems in place, both factors that rule out Exchange and Notes.
http://www.eweek.com/article2/0,3959,357158,00.asp

KERBER COMMENTS ON NEW BOOK (Chronicle of Higher Education, July 5)
LINDA K. KERBER
, a professor of history at the University of Iowa and author of "No Constitutional Right to Be Ladies: Women and the Obligations of Citizenship" (Hill and Wang, 1998), writes about the book "Rethinking American History in a Global Age." Kerber says although the book went to press before September 11, "we read it necessarily in a post-September 11 perspective. Readers may no longer need persuading that the United States cannot be well understood unless it is placed in an international context, but there is still a pressing need for this book." Edited by New York University's Thomas Bender and published by the University of California Press, the collection of essays was jointly sponsored by New York University and the Organization of American Historians and grew out of a series of conferences that brought scholars who study American history, and some who study other regions, together from around the world. "As president of the OAH at the time of the project's inception five years ago, I enthusiastically supported it," Kerber writes.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v48/i43/43b01401.htm

COLEMAN WARNS OF BUDGET IMPACT (Chronicle of Higher Education, July 5)
Flagship institutions throughout the United States are facing significant financial pressure, and tuitions are surging as a result, which raises the questions: Are the states frittering away their public-university jewels by failing to adequately invest in them? And as state appropriations make up an ever smaller proportion of flagship budgets, would the elite institutions be better off with greater control over their own affairs, even if that meant less state money? The first question has led to a flurry of cautionary opinion pieces and speeches by public-university presidents. The University of Iowa has seen the proportion of state funds in its budget drop from 75 percent in 1914 to just under 19 percent today. MARY SUE COLEMAN, who is leaving the Iowa presidency for the top job at the University of Michigan, warned in a recent speech about "the dangers of privatizing public higher education and bringing about a radical change in our character."
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v48/i43/43a01901.htm

BAR WHERE STUDENTS BURNED MAY BE SOLD (Omaha World-Herald, July 4)
The downtown Iowa City bar where nine people were injured when a fiery stunt burned out of control may soon be under new ownership, officials say. The City Council on Tuesday approved a liquor license and dance permit for George Etre, who is negotiating to buy Et Cetera, a nightclub popular among UNIVERSITY OF IOWA students. The bar has been the focus of an investigation since April, when police say the general manager ignited a puddle of grain alcohol poured into the bar's drink well. Nine people near the fire were burned when more liquor was poured on the blaze, creating a flash fire.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=439679

DUNBAR COMMENTS ON CHICAGO TESTING (Chicago Sun-Times, July 3)
A record number of Chicago public school students began mandatory summer school Tuesday based on a new promotion policy that has left some parents wondering if it really is tougher, as officials claim. The sheer numbers of those attending--32,840--is the highest ever, even though nationally normed reading and math scores were at their highest levels since Mayor Daley was given control of the city schools in 1995. School CEO Arne Duncan could not explain how the new test score cutoffs, which require students to hit at least the 35th percentile nationally and, in some cases, as low as the 24th in reading and math, matched up with the old system of "grade equivalents,'' which parents have grown used to over the decades. He directed reporters to the University of Iowa, which helps write the test, but University of Iowa test author STEVE DUNBAR could not provide a conversion, although he said one was possible. … Dunbar said one reason University of Iowa test experts recommended against using grade equivalents is because many parents misunderstood them. Some thought that a third grader with a score of 10.0 was doing 10th grade work. In reality, Dunbar said, the third grader was scoring similar to that of a 10th grader taking the third-grade test.
http://www.suntimes.com/output/news/cst-nws-skul03.html

CENTER FOR BOOK HELPS PRESERVE DOCUMENTS (Wall Street Journal, July 3)
A story about efforts to preserve rare and important U.S. documents, including the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution and the Bill of Rights, includes a diagram of a state of the art storage system that includes backing paper made by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA CENTER FOR THE BOOK out of textile-quality cotton. The story says the paper provides an opaque background that makes the documents easier to read, and texture to help hold them in place.
http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB1025638264964111560.djm,00.html

BOWLSBY COMMENTS ON PLAYER ARRESTS (Omaha World-Herald, July 3)
University of Iowa Athletic Director BOB BOWLSBY says he trusts the ability of football coaches to deal with an ever-growing number of players breaking the law. The most recent case involved the arrest Sunday of sophomore defensive lineman DERRECK ROBINSON, who was charged with possession of marijuana. Robinson is believed to be the seventh Hawkeye arrested in the past 16 months, five of whom have been charged with drunken driving. "We have a lot of people that spend a lot of time delivering the message that student-athletes have a responsibility," Bowlsby said Monday. "We have 130 kids on the football team and it's not reasonable to think we're immune (from problems). We're constantly looking at ways to improve, and I feel good about what the coaches are doing in this area. That doesn't mean we're without embarrassing moments," he said. Iowa Head Coach KIRK FERENTZ met with Robinson, 19, to discuss punishment and counseling. The player was listed as a second-team defensive end on the team's spring depth chart.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=38&u_sid=438430

PLAYER CHARGED WITH DRUG POSSESSION (Omaha World-Herald, July 2)
University of Iowa defensive end DERRECK ROBINSON was arrested Sunday and charged with possession of marijuana, police and athletic department officials said. Following a review of the case, team officials say the sophomore from Minneapolis will face disciplinary action in accordance with team policy, most likely a one-game suspension.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=38&u_sid=437794

ESPN SPECIAL FEATURES UI WRESTLING (Los Angeles Times, July 2)
The paper previews an ESPN special that aired Tuesday night, "The Season: Iowa Wrestling." This episode of the "The Season," ESPN's popular series that takes viewers behind the scenes as it follows a team through a season, is the first of two one-hour shows focusing on wrestling at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The second part will be shown a week from tonight. The documentary, narrated by actor Dylan McDermott, provides an up-close look at a college sport that demands so much, yet returns so little. Viewers will get a first-hand look at the raw emotion wrestlers go through after a devastating loss. However, after a win, these wrestlers show little emotion. That's because winning is expected at Iowa. The school enjoyed one of the sport's all-time dynasties when DAN GABLE was coaching there.
http://www.latimes.com/sports/la-sp-corner02jul02.story

UI IS IN SMALLPOX VACCINE STUDY (San Jose Mercury News, July 2)
When a pharmaceutical company's discovery of more than 70 million doses of decades-old smallpox vaccine was made public in March, the federal government got some much-needed breathing room for its plan to vaccinate every American in the event of a bio-terrorist attack. But is the old vaccine, which has been frozen for many years, still potent and safe? Kaiser Permanente's Vaccine Research Center in Oakland -- along with three other U.S. sites -- will investigate that question for the National Institutes of Health. On Monday, Kaiser scientists will begin injecting 40 to 50 healthy young people with doses of the old vaccine and newer supplies, some of them diluted, to compare their effectiveness and safety. The researchers are recruiting Kaiser patients ages 18 to 32, who are in good health and have never received a smallpox vaccination. The study, comprising 400 to 500 subjects nationwide, will be speedy: Kaiser researchers expect to submit data to the NIH in August. The other research sites are Vanderbilt University in Tennessee, Baylor University in Texas and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.bayarea.com/mld/mercurynews/3589308.htm

OFFICIALS: CLONING BAN HURTS UI (Omaha World Herald, July 2)
University of Iowa scientists say a new law that prohibits human cloning is forcing them to leave the state to take part in the newest phases of stem-cell research. The law, approved by Iowa's Legislature this spring, forbids so-called therapeutic cloning, which involves placing the nucleus of another human cell into an unfertilized egg. University officials say the changes are hobbling the university's role and status in a pioneering field of research. Scientists say the procedure can be used to help find cures for Alzheimer's disease and cancer. The new law is forcing some researchers to cross state lines to work in states that allow the study of therapeutic cloning. "It means we can never be leaders, we can only be collaborators at other institutions," said MARY HENDRIX, a professor of anatomy and cell biology. ROBERT KELCH, university vice president, said the law also will hurt the school's ability to keep and attract top researchers and its ability to partner with companies hoping to commercialize new medical treatments. "The real issue is not the immediate effect on the faculty who are here or what will happen tomorrow. This has a longer-term chilling effect on biomedical researchers in Iowa," Kelch said.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=437553

UI TOUGHENS HARASSMENT POLICY (Omaha World Herald, July 2)
A tougher new policy requiring University of Iowa faculty and staff to report workplace sexual harassment to campus Affirmative Action officials went into effect Monday. University officials say the policy is a clearer, more effective version of a policy that was first introduced 20 years ago to protect the school from liability in a sexual harassment lawsuit. The new version gives the Office of Affirmative Action the power to investigate and respond to allegations of sexual harassment. Employees who do not share knowledge of sexual harassment "will be taken with the utmost of seriousness and handled on a case-by-case basis," said CHARLOTTE WESTERHAUS, the director of Affirmative Action.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=437547

FORMER UI DOCTOR COMMENTS ON MEDIA (Modern Physician, July 1)
In the 1980s, when a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA public affairs officer asked pathologist Kent Bottles, M.D., to answer questions about Pap smears from a Des Moines Register reporter, Bottles was apprehensive. It was his first media interview. ''I hadn't learned the tricks of the trade,'' says Bottles, who is now CEO of Grand Rapids (Mich.) Medical Education & Research Center. Twenty years and numerous interviews later, he says he has learned to answer questions succinctly, avoid medical jargon and appeal to a mass audience. Many physician executives have overcome apprehensions about publicity. They recognize responding to media requests can enhance their own credibility and that of their organizations. But, as Bottles notes, learning to meet a reporter's needs is critical to becoming an effective media expert.
http://proxy.lib.uiowa.edu/login?url=http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=5c179e77e4eaa5f8a0473a82bbd996c7&_docnum=4&wchp=dGLSlS-lSlzV&_md5=fd8f0b9d89d9994287d2b7fb1d394cf9

UI GRAD, NOVELIST TO HEAD TAIWAN CULTURE CENTER (Taipei Times, July 1)
Ping Lu, the renowned novelist who was appointed for a second year as one of Taiwan's 12 ambassadors-at-large yesterday, will be required to relinquish the post when she finally takes up her position as director of Taiwan's Kwang Hwa Information and Culture Center in Hong Kong. The ambassador-at-large post is an unpaid quasi-diplomatic position. Ping was appointed as the director of KHICC in January, but the Hong Kong government has yet to issue her working visa. There has been speculation, however, that Ping will not be accepted in Hong Kong because of her suspected political leanings. Ping graduated from National Taiwan University with a degree in psychology. She has a master's degree in statistics from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and is now teaching at the National Institute of the Arts. The Taipei Times is based in Taiwan.
http://www.taipeitimes.com/news/2002/07/01/story/0000146572

UTERINE GROWTHS STUDIED AT UI (HealthScout News, July 1)
Less may be more when it comes to treating small, noncancerous uterine growths such as polyps or fibroid tumors. That's the conclusion of a new study, which finds that many of these small growths will simply disappear on their own. The study, the first ever to document the natural progression of polyps, appears in the July issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology. Experts say it is good news for women who want to avoid surgery, which is currently the most commonly recommended treatment for these uterine abnormalities. "If the polyp or fibroid is small and the woman is not experiencing any symptoms, then taking wait-and-see approach is justified," says Dr. BRADLEY J. VAN VOORHIS, study author and a professor of reproductive endocrinology at the University of Iowa College of Medicine. The article appeared in YAHOO NEWS at
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/hsn/20020702/hl_hsn/wait_and_see_approach_backed_for_small_uterine_growths

GRANT COMMENTS ON TITLE IX (Philadelphia Inquirer, July 1)
After decades of lobbying to be set apart from Title IX, football's supporters continue to argue that cuts in their programs would be counterproductive because they generate the bulk of college sports' revenue. To some, resistance to tampering with football's budgets and scholarship limits is just a case of an entrenched male sports establishment stubbornly defending its turf - not to mention its weight rooms and special menus. Football, they argue, had 100 years without the distraction of women's sports, accumulating financial, political and popular support. "For so long, all the resources went into building football programs into revenue-producing machines," said CHRISTINE GRANT, former athletic director for women's sports at the University of Iowa. "Now they are using that discriminatory advantage to justify continuing discrimination against women."
http://www.philly.com/mld/inquirer/news/front/3578818.htm

UI FINDS OINTMENT REDUCES INFECTIONS (Cleanrooms, July 2002)
A New England Journal of Medicine study indicates that applying mupirocin ointment in the noses of patients before surgery significantly reduces the rate of staphylococcus aureus (S. aurens) nosocomial infections among patients who carry this bacteria. The report, which was based on several years of research, was conducted at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS AND CLINICS. Cleanrooms is a monthly publication based in Nashua, N.H.

D'ALESSANDRO OFFERS FEVER ADVICE (Parents, July 2002)
An article about what to do when your baby has a fever notes that there are a number of ways to take a baby's temperature, including under the arm or with an ear thermometer. "I'm happy with any temperature a parent can give me," says mom of two DONNA D'ALESSANDRO, M.D., an associate professor of pediatrics at the University of Iowa Medical Center in Iowa City. "Digital, glass, and ear thermometers all work fine, although ear thermometers may vary a little more." D'Alessandro also recommends pushing fluids and says parents shouldn't be too quick to medicate. "If my son has a low-grade fever and is acting fine, then I don't treat it," she says. "But if the fever is making him uncomfortable, then I usually give him acetaminophen.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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